Select Page
Tracking Climate Change Funding: Learning from Gender-Responsive Budgeting

Tracking Climate Change Funding: Learning from Gender-Responsive Budgeting

This paper looks at what budgeting for climate change initiatives can learn from gender-responsive budgeting (GRB). It draws on the author’s experience of working on GRB and child-friendly budgeting in more than 30 countries and advising even more countries long distance on these topics.

A separate companion paper describes in more technical detail the approach taken by various countries to gender budget statements.

Gender-Responsive Government Budgeting

This working paper provides thorough information on gender mainstreaming in the budget process. By investigating analytical and technical tools of gender-responsive government budgeting (GRGB), this analysis reveals the main obstacles in the direction and implementation of gender sensitive budgets within developing countries, including gender-biased cultures and lack of gender analysis expertise and gender-disaggregated data in most government organizations. Finally, the article offers a summary of multilateral organizations’ activities in promoting (GRGB) around the world, in both developed and developing countries.

What is a Gender Audit?

Overview of a gender audit, understood as a way to “locate women” in the national budget as well as in the economy. The author highlights the importance of a gender audit to ensure that men and women benefit equally from budget allocations, to raise women’s awareness of economic issues in order to stimulate their involvement in the budget-making process, and to promote a more efficient use of the resources committed to areas relevant to women. The paper draws primarily from the Israeli context but also presents brief examples from Australia, Canada, England, France, and South Africa.

Gender Budgets Make More Cents: Country Studies and Good Practice

Overview of a gender audit – understood as a way to “locate women” in the national budget as well as in the economy. The author highlights the importance of a gender audit to ensure that men and women benefit equally from budget allocations, to raise women’s awareness of economic issues in order to stimulate their involvement in the budget-making process, and to promote a more efficient use of the resources committed to areas relevant to women. The paper draws primarily from the Israeli context but also presents brief examples from Australia, Canada, England, France, and South Africa.