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Argentina: Enforcing a Legal Victory for Universal Access to Education

Argentina: Enforcing a Legal Victory for Universal Access to Education

June 2016 | by Fernando Basch, Professor of Law at the University of Palermo and the University of San Andrés and a partner at Governance Latam

ibp-acij-argentina-access-to-educationPublic interest litigation can be a powerful tool for holding governments to account. Yet ensuring lasting change in government policies and actions often requires more than a win in the courtroom. This case study recounts the Civil Association for Equality and Justice (ACIJ) campaign in Argentina to push the City of Buenos Aires to comply with its legal obligation to provide free public education to children between the ages of 45 days and five years. While the campaign is ongoing, ACIJ has already managed to secure more places for students, better spending on infrastructure, and a new system of online enrollment.

The success of ACIJ’s campaign hinged on its ability to adapt to a dynamic political environment, changing tactics where appropriate. Responding to a breakdown in the formal mechanisms for monitoring government compliance, the ACIJ lobbied both the executive and the legislature, took further legal action, and mobilized public support through the media and other advocacy efforts.

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Taking an Ecosystems Approach: Samarthan’s Work on Rural Poverty in India

Taking an Ecosystems Approach: Samarthan’s Work on Rural Poverty in India

September 2016 | by Brendan Halloran, IBP (adapted from a longer study by Padmaja Nair)

india samarthan case study

Despite years of strong economic growth in India, rural poverty still affects tens of millions of households. In 2005, the government created the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGS) to address rural poverty. The scheme, which commits the government to providing adult members of rural households with 100 days of paid work, should provide a revolutionary safety net for rural households. Yet corruption, insufficient administrative capacity, a lack of awareness among many rural inhabitants, and manipulation by influential political and economic actors have undermined it.

Samarthan, an organization dedicated to pursuing more inclusive development in the state of Madhya Pradesh, has worked to realize the scheme’s potentially transformative promise. It has pursued this aim through an evolving understanding of the challenges and opportunities inherent in the complex system of actors, processes, and tools. This case study summarizes Samarthan’s approach, the role of IBP in supporting the organization, and describes the impacts and lessons learned.

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Taking an Ecosystems Approach: Support for Advocacy Training Initiatives’ (SATHI) Public Health Work in India

Taking an Ecosystems Approach: Support for Advocacy Training Initiatives’ (SATHI) Public Health Work in India

September 2016 | by Brendan Halloran, IBP (adapted from a longer study by Padmaja Nair)

case study public health india

The state of Maharashta is one of India’s most powerful economic engines. Yet despite India’s commitment to the principle of universal access, the state government spends less than 4 percent of its budget on health. Many social groups in Maharashta still lack access to quality healthcare and poor individuals are often forced to seek expensive private options.

Support for Advocacy and Training to Health Initiatives (SATHI) has been working to improve healthcare in Maharashta for almost 20 years. SATHI has worked with the objective of making the public health delivery system accessible and equitable to all, especially poor and marginalized people. SATHI’s work takes place along three fronts: ensuring the accountability of the public health system, establishing social control over private health systems, and promoting universal access to quality health care.

This case study documents the strategies and achievements of SATHI and its coalition partners, the impacts of CSO interventions on public health delivery and accountability, and challenges that have emerged.

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Ukraine: Light of Hope’s Work Improving Social Services For Marginalized Groups

Ukraine: Light of Hope’s Work Improving Social Services For Marginalized Groups

October 2016 | by Sergii Slukhai, Professor of Economics at Taras Shevchenko Kyiv National University, Ukraine

case-study-ukraine-social-servicesLight of Hope was founded in 1999 as a charity association with the mission of helping people living with HIV/AIDS in the Ukrainian city of Poltava and the surrounding region. Over time its mission, and the range of services it has provided, has expanded to encompass other marginalized groups. The organization began to work with people struggling with substance abuse and then former inmates. Light of Hope eventually became one of Ukraine’s largest and most successful non-state service delivery organizations.

In 2011 it embarked on a pioneering campaign to collaborate with the city government of Poltava. This case study examines the Light of Hope’s efforts to establish the Poltava Social Adaptation Center, which received unprecedented fiscal support from the local government. It documents how Light of Hope managed to successfully establish a facility to deliver a complex array of services to ex-prisoners, drug users, people who are HIV-positive, and the homeless. Light of Hope was able to garner an unprecedented level of support from the city government for the center, including funding from the city budget. In the process, the organization also challenged the stigma surrounding marginalized groups.

This case study provides useful lessons for service delivery organizations seeking a wider strategy for winning social change.

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Ukraine: Combating Corruption Disguised as Charity

Ukraine: Combating Corruption Disguised as Charity

October 2016 | by Iryna Postolovska, Harvard School of Public Health

Combating Corruption in Ukraine Case Study International Budget PartnershipCorruption takes many forms and guises, some seemingly innocuous. When governments fail to provide enough resources to deliver quality healthcare, can’t charitable contributions help cover the gap? However, when charitable contributions are made to seem like requirements to receive services, and when the funds involved are opaque and unaccountable, there is cause for suspicion.

This case study describes how health advocates in the Ukrainian city of Poltava created the Institute of Analysis and Advocacy (IAA) to take on entrenched corruption in the provision of local healthcare. IAA’s campaign targeted different levels of government and links in the service delivery chain, from individual hospitals to the national legislature. Reformers undertook a variety of complementary tactics to uncover and document corruption, lobby for change, and address the root causes of corruption in the healthcare system. All of this took place against a backdrop of the toppling of a corrupt regime during Ukraine’s Euromaidan Revolution in 2014.

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